Upper Eyelid Surgery FAQ Videos

How Much Swelling Occurs after Upper Eyelid Surgery?

How Much Swelling Occurs after Upper Eyelid Surgery?


Any inflammation that occurs during or after eyelid surgery is influenced by the following: (1) method of anesthesia, (2) surgical technique, (3) aftercare received after completion of surgery, (4) at home aftercare, and (5) the existence of other disorders such as sinus problems and allergies.

One of the ways that Dr. Amiya Prasad lessens post-surgery swelling is by employing his own sedation technique—LITE™ IV sedation. LITE™ stands for “local”, “intravenous”, “tumescent/twilight” with “ease of recovery”. This type of sedation method places patients in a relaxed but conscious state that is generally less taxing on the body. Patients are able to recover from surgery much quicker and return to work sooner.

Can I Change My Eye Shape?

Can I Change My Eye Shape?


Eye shape is dependent on genetic characteristics like (1) dimension, (2) prominence, and (3) the shape and position of bones, tissues and ligaments around the eye. All these features are unalike for each person, and thus it is crucial to converse with your surgeon on which approach can give you the most natural-looking results.

Why do My Eyes Look So Tired? Should I See an Eye Surgeon or a Plastic Surgeon?

Why do My Eyes Look So Tired? Should I See an Eye Surgeon or a Plastic Surgeon?


As an Oculofacial plastic surgeon with over 20 years of experience, Dr. Amiya Prasad has seen to many corrective surgery cases, and has noted that eyes can look tired because of droopy eyelids and puffy under eye bags. He emphasizes the fact that eye surgery, if done poorly, has a serious effect on the function and health of the eyes, and thus it is vital that patients meet with a very experienced surgeon who specializes in that particular field. It is easy to be won over by notable terms like “Board Certified”; however, this term alone is not indicative of any specialized training or expertise in the area. Dr. Prasad recommends that patients do thorough research first before undergoing any kind of surgery.

How are Upper and Lower Eyelid Surgery Performed?

How are Upper and Lower Eyelid Surgery Performed?


Oculofacial plastic surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad performs blepharoplasty with the use of his intravenous LITE™ IV sedation method—a technique that places patients in a relaxed, but still conscious state. This type of sedation method has been proven to allow patients to recover from surgery much quicker than they would had they been placed under general anesthesia.

During an upper eyelid blepharoplasty procedure, problems with the eyelid crease and extra skin on the eyelid are addressed. Other cases may also call for fat sculpting around the eye area as well. A lower eyelid blepharoplasty procedure addresses the problem of eye bags, and can be done from a transcutaneous (outside) or transconjunctival (inside) approach. Be sure to seek out a surgeon with superior eyelid surgery skills, as poorly done eye surgery can lead to other complications.

What are the Risks of Eyelid Surgery?

What are the Risks of Eyelid Surgery?


The risks of eyelid surgery can include the following: (1) bleeding, (2) infection, (3) drooping of the upper eyelids after surgery, (4) skin shortage that prevents full eyelid closure, (5) unwanted scarring, (6) lower eyelid retraction, (7) ectropion, (8) dry eyes and, (9) corneal ulceration. Be sure to have a complete medical and physical evaluation of your eyes before undergoing surgery, to prevent the risk of developing complications. A proper examination should include a proper diagnosis of any existing eye issues, such as ptosis or lacrimal gland prolapse.

How are Eyelid Surgery Scars Minimized?

How are Eyelid Surgery Scars Minimized?


Post-surgery scars can be avoided with (1) detailed planning, (2) minimally traumatic surgery and, (3) immediate post-operative care.

Dr. Amiya Prasad prefers the transconjunctival approach when performing a lower blepharoplasty, as it is less traumatic and leaves no external incisions on the skin. For upper blepharoplasty, Dr. Prasad employs his artistic eye when planning where to place the incisions in such a way that will be barely visible, even when the eyes are closed. After surgery, Dr. Prasad employs a suturing technique and administers platelet-rich plasma (PRP), in order to accelerate the healing process. This combination, along with proper home aftercare, has helped patients recover quicker with less scarring.

Do I Have Eyelid Ptosis, Extra Skin, or Both?

Do I Have Eyelid Ptosis, Extra Skin, or Both?


If the margin of the eyelid looks lower than normal, this is called “ptosis”—a disorder caused by a weakened levator muscle, which lead to sleepy and droopy-looking eyelids. In other cases, a patient may have excess skin that sits over the eyelid and weighs it down—a symptom of dermatochalasis. Ptosis can be addressed by having ptosis surgery to fix the orientation of the eyelid, and an upper eyelid blepharoplasty can address the extra skin over the eyes. Some people may have both issues at the same time, and both procedures can be performed.

Are the Results of Eyelid Surgery Permanent?

Are the Results of Eyelid Surgery Permanent?


The effects of eyelid surgery can last between 5-10 years, given the following circumstances: (1) the patient’s age at the time of the surgery, (2) the patient’s overall health, and (3) the state of the patient’s skin. Oculofacial plastic surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad makes it a point to manage his patient’s expectations by helping them gain an understanding of how our faces age over the years and how this can affect the results of surgery.

How Do I Prepare Before Eyelid Surgery?

How Do I Prepare Before Eyelid Surgery?


When preparing for eyelid surgery, it is important to disclose the following information to your surgeon: (1) your overall health status and whether you have any prevailing conditions or ailments, (2) if you are taking any prescription medicine or supplements, and (3) if you have or had any eye ailments such as dry eyes or blepharitis. It is vital to address these conditions first before undergoing surgery in order to prevent any complications during surgery. Keep in mind that the more thorough you are about your medical history, the more favorable it will be for both you and your surgeon.

What are the Potential Eyelid Surgery Complications?

What are the Potential Eyelid Surgery Complications?


Some common complications patients may experience are the following: (1) droopy upper eyelids, (2) skin shortage that hinders the eye from closing properly, (3) lower eyelid scleral show, (4) lower eyelid retraction, and (5) ectropion. In order to steer clear of complications like these, pursue the services of a surgeon who concentrates on this type of eye surgery, as you can be assured that he will have a deeper and more extensive level of training and specialization in the field. Pursue a surgeon who will also be committed to understanding your own aesthetic goals, as well as the kind of results you hope to see.

Which Doctor is Best for Eyelid Surgery?

Which Doctor is Best for Eyelid Surgery?


Doing research is the best way to find yourself the right doctor for your case. Because eye surgery is a very complex practice, it most definitely necessitates skills and knowledge that most general surgeons simply do not possess; thus it is essential to look for a specialist with the proper training background and area of expertise. The amount of experience a doctor has is another important value to take into consideration. As a cosmetic Oculofacial plastic surgeon with over 20 years of experience, Dr. Amiya Prasad makes it a priority to educate patients about eyelid surgery so they can make more informed decisions.

What Type of Anesthesia is Best for Eyelid Surgery?

What Type of Anesthesia is Best for Eyelid Surgery?


Practicing Oculofacial plastic surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad chooses to use his own method of sedation for surgical procedures—LITE™ anesthesia. LITE™ anesthesia stands for “local”, “intravenous”, “tumescent/twilight” with “ease of recovery”. This type of sedation method places the patient in a tranquil state, while still being conscious during the procedure. In Dr. Prasad’s experience, this technique is less taxing on the body, as opposed to general anesthesia wherein the patient is completely unconscious and placed on a ventilator.

I have Dark Skin. Is Upper Eyelid Surgery Safe for Me? I Don’t want Keloids.

I have Dark Skin. Is Upper Eyelid Surgery Safe for Me? I Don't want Keloids.


The formation of keloids in darker skinned individuals can be avoided if extra precaution and care are given. In his article, “Ethnic Considerations in Eyelid Surgery”, Dr. Amiya Prasad says that a good understanding of the skin type, facial anatomy and optimal placement of incisions on darker skinned people can help prevent the formation of keloids. Thus, it is advisable to seek out a surgeon with significant familiarity in treating darker skinned people and allots the needed time to fully evaluate and understand a patient’s case.

When can I Go Back to Work after Eyelid Surgery?

When can I Go Back to Work after Eyelid Surgery?


Because downtime after surgery is often viewed as an inconvenience, Dr. Amiya Prasad established his own system of treatment that helps patients recover faster, with less downtime. It starts in his Joint Commission-accredited operating facilities, wherein he performs all surgeries with the assistance of an efficient team of nurses who he works with consistently. Years of experience have shown that the convenience of working in your own private facilities with a team you’re familiar with makes surgical procedures run faster and smoother. When surgery is done, immediate one-on-one aftercare is given, which also plays an important role in helping patients recuperate faster. Patients are usually able to return to work within one week.

Is Eyelid Surgery Safe if I have Dry Eyes?

Is Eyelid Surgery Safe if I have Dry Eyes?


As an Oculofacial plastic surgeon, Dr. Amiya Prasad repeatedly comes across dry eye cases and has successfully performed eyelid surgery on many severe dry eye cases, and even on patients with Sjogrens Syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid eye disease. Before having eye surgery, patients are evaluated and examined in order to determine the best position for the lower eyelid, which will better facilitate the proper lubrication of the eyes.

What’s Better for Hooded Eyes: Lasers or Surgery?

What's Better for Hooded Eyes: Lasers or Surgery?


The heat from laser and radiofrequency instruments is designed to heat the skin and raise it by slow contracture. However, hooded eyes means that there is a lot of extra skin that needs to be contracted, which will take several sessions to fix. In addition to that, hooded eyes often have areas of fat that need sculpting, and only surgery will allow the surgeon to successfully manipulate these fatty areas. The precise manipulation of these areas of fat subsequently leads to better looking results.

Do Radio Frequency Devices Work for Hooded Eyes?

Do Radio Frequency Devices Work for Hooded Eyes?


High heat radiofrequency devices sometimes do more damage than good, as they tend to burn or even “cook” the much-needed layer of fat under the skin, rather than tighten skin. This only speeds up the skin’s aging process. Remember that more heat does not mean more skin tightening is happening. In order the preserve the skin and retain its quality, an upper eyelid blepharoplasty is recommended for hooded eyes.

What is Eyelid Surgery Recovery Like When Performed by Oculofacial Plastic Surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad

What is Eyelid Surgery Recovery Like When Performed by Oculofacial Plastic Surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad


The rate of success of ptosis surgery is determined by the following:

(1) The type of surgery
(2) If other surgeries are performed alongside it
(3) The type of anesthesia used
(4) The surgical team
(5) The surgical technique
(6) The post-operative recovery process

Dr. Amiya Prasad has developed his own sedation technique specifically for his practice. This technique—LITE™ IV sedation—allows patients to emerge from surgery feeling more refreshed than they normally would had they been given general anesthesia. This type of sedation technique also lessens the post-surgery downtime experience.

In order to keep surgical procedures running smoothly, Dr. Prasad chooses to work in his own Joint Commission-accredited operating facilities with a consistent and tight-knit team of highly proficient professionals. Working in such a set-up makes everything enormously convenient for both surgeon and patient, as they are able to give patients the immediate care they need, which ultimately leads to a better recovery experience for them. With this kind of attentive care, most people are able to work again after 5-7 days.

Dr. Prasad asserts that with any type of surgery, technical expertise, experience, and an artistic eye are indispensable. Mastery of these techniques and exposure to different cases contributes to a surgeon’s ability to make more accurate decisions and improves the way he responds to different scenarios.

Plastic Surgeon, Ophthalmologist, or Eyelid Specialist for Eyelid Surgery?

Plastic Surgeon, Ophthalmologist, or Eyelid Specialist for Eyelid Surgery?


Due to financial interests and competition, some surgeons have been known to engage in inter-specialty rivalry, claiming superiority over other groups of surgeons, and even overselling the term “Board-certified surgeon” in an effort to market their own practices.

As a practicing Oculofacial plastic surgeon with over 20 years of experience, Dr. Amiya Prasad consistently entertains patients from all over the world who seek corrective surgery for improper surgical jobs done elsewhere. Based on his experience, quite a few of these bad surgery jobs are often performed by general surgeons touting the “Board-certified” label. Dr. Prasad asserts that the “Board-certified” label is not entirely indicative of a surgeon’s technical abilities, proficiency and artistry, and that there will always be inconsistencies. With that in mind, it is important for the patients to do their own research and seek out a surgeon who specializes in the type of surgery they are considering and will spend time understanding their case, as well as their aesthetic goals.

How Can I Tell if I Need Blepharoptosis or Blepharoplasty?

How Can I Tell if I Need Blepharoptosis or Blepharoplasty?


The orientation of the eyelid in comparison to the pupil is a crucial factor in deciding whether you will need blepharoptosis repair or blepharoplasty.

Blepharoptosis is present when the eyelid margin is lower than it should be, and dermatochalasis refers to extra skin over the eyelids, which gives eyes a hooded appearance. Dermatochalasis can be corrected by undergoing a blepharoplasty procedure. It is not uncommon for ptosis to go unnoticed, especially when a plastic surgeon mistakenly concludes that doing blepharoplasty will automatically fix the problem of drooping eyelids. It is also not unusual to find both dermatochalasis and blepharoptosis in some people, which can occasionally be a bit tricky when formulating a proper diagnosis and surgical plan for.

During the initial checkup, Dr. Amiya Prasad establishes whether a patient has ptosis by lifting up the extra skin to see if it has a positive effect on the eyelid margin or not. If the eyelid margin remains low, then he can assume that the patient has eyelid ptosis, which can be easily addressed with surgery.

What is the Difference Between an Eyelid Lift, Blepharoplasty, and Ptosis Surgery?

What is the Difference Between an Eyelid Lift, Blepharoplasty, and Ptosis Surgery?


Eyelid lifts are performed to remove, improve, or sculpt extra skin and fat around the eyelids, while blepharoplasty is performed on the upper and lower eyelids to address extra skin, fat, and other structural issues. A patient can choose if they want to undergo either an upper or lower eyelid blepharoplasty, or both. Ptosis surgery, on the other hand, is a procedure specifically designed to fix the orientation of the eyelid margin in relation to the pupil. Other specific ptosis procedures may also incorporate levator muscle advancement, levator resection, and frontalis sling.

Browlift Versus Blepharoplasty – Which is Best for Sagging Eyelids?

Browlift Versus Blepharoplasty - Which is Best for Sagging Eyelids?


When considering a patient who is troubled by excess skin over the eyes, the first step is to determine the cause. Dr. Prasad first looks for brow ptosis or descent of the eyebrow, and extra skin over the eyelids (dermatochalasis). Generally, if brow ptosis is present, then it is expected that dermatochalasis is also present. Keep in mind that blepharoplasty can be the sole answer for sagging eyelids, or it can be part of the answer. On the other hand, brow lifts can only become a considerable prospect if brow ptosis is present. The defining factor will ultimately depend on the source of the sagging skin, as well as the patient’s aesthetic goals.

How Can I Fix One Drooping Eye?

How Can I Fix One Drooping Eye?


If a patient’s baggy eyelids are caused by excess skin over the eyes (dermatochalasis), then a blepharoplasty is performed. If it is caused by ptosis, then ptosis surgery is done. Remember that before anything else, it is always important for a patient to meet with a specialist first, get a thorough diagnosis and discuss which procedure is right for their case.

Do I Have Eyelid Ptosis or Extra Skin?

Do I Have Eyelid Ptosis or Extra Skin?


Ptosis refers to a physical condition wherein the orientation of the eyelid margin relative to the pupil is lower than normal. Sometimes, the presence of extra skin above the eyelid can weigh it down and change its position or even affect vision. This condition is called “mechanical ptosis”. During a preliminary check-up, Dr. Amiya Prasad will try to determine where the eyelid margin is positioned by lifting the extra skin. If the margin remains at a low orientation after lifting, it is probable that you have ptosis, and if that is the case, it is recommended that you undergo ptosis surgery to correct it, as this cannot be fixed by blepharoplasty alone.

How Blepharoplasty is Performed by Oculoplastic Surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad

How Blepharoplasty is Performed by Oculoplastic Surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad


Blepharoplasty is an upper and/or lower eyelid surgical procedure that is designed to improve the look and function of the eyes, and to address extra skin and swollen fat pockets around the eyes.

Dr. Amiya Prasad, a committed Oculofacial plastic surgeon with 20 years of experience, emphasizes the significance of performing blepharoplasty with not only a deep understanding of eye health, but as well as the importance of having the technical know-how to successfully realize the main objectives of the surgery.

Many of Dr. Prasad’s clientele come to him to get corrective surgery for procedures that were inadequately done by other surgeons. He attends to patients in his Joint Commission-accredited operating facilities, normally using local anesthesia with intravenous (IV) sedation. Within a week, most of his patients are able to return to work without feeling too much pain.

What are the Possible Complications of Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)?

What are the Possible Complications of Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)?


Some complications that may arise during blepharoplasty are: (1) excessive bleeding, (2) infection, (3) unwanted scarring, (4) vision loss, and (5) double vision.

Keep in mind that matters such as extra skin and sagging fat pockets around the eyes do not typically fall under the category of “complications”, and are considered “enhancements”. Dr. Amiya Prasad often performs such enhancements on patients pursuing corrective surgery to fix unsatisfactory results from an earlier surgery done by another surgeon. Most of the time, the most frequent reason why people get revision surgery is to address retraction of the lower eyelid, which is a complication wherein the lower part of the eyes becomes exposed and irritated. It is best to seek out a surgeon who specializes in such cases in order to understand the best approach for treating it.